Back to Top
adoption Hospital or Birth Plan

Birth Mothers: Why You Should be Creating Your Hospital or Birth Plan Now

Birth Mothers: Why You Should be Creating Your Hospital or Birth Plan Now

Perhaps one of the most critical steps in the adoption process in Florida is preparing for your due date. Depending upon where you’re at in your pregnancy, you may be thinking, “I don’t need to worry about that yet!” Though it is wise to avoid additional worry, keep in mind that the day your child is born is one of the most important, yet stressful, days in the adoption process -- so, you’ll want it to go smoothly! By creating your hospital or birth plan sooner rather than later, you’ll eliminate an enormous amount of stress, and trust Adoption Choices of Florida when we say that your future self will thank you!

So, What Exactly is a Hospital or Birth Plan? 

Basically, your hospital or birth plan is a document created by you -- and perhaps your adoption team -- that consists of your preferences in regard to your hospital stay and giving birth. Listing these preferences is an important part of avoiding confusion or miscommunication and reducing stress on the day of your child’s birth. 

Discussing Your Hospital or Birth Plan

You may find it helpful to talk out your hospital or birth plan with your social worker, emotional support counselor, a trusted family member or friend, and/or -- depending upon which type of adoption you choose -- your child’s adoptive parents. Including these crucial members of your support system in your hospital or birth plan is a great way to ensure that everyone is clear on your preferences regarding the hospital stay and giving birth. Remember, your only concern on the day your child is born should be the actual labor and delivery process -- let everyone else deal with the rest!

Your Preferences: The Hospital Stay

Though it can be helpful to discuss your hospital or birth plan with members of your support system, it’s totally up to you on who you want to include. In regard to your child’s adoptive parents, however, the day of your child’s birth is just as exciting and nerve-wracking for them as it is for you. Before your due date, it’s important for you to have a conversation with them about your preferences related to the hospital stay, since it’s more than likely they’ll be there as well. During this conversation, you may want to discuss:

  • Whether or not you want them or someone else from your support system at the hospital or in the room with you at the time your baby is born or after

  • Who will hold the baby first -- you don’t have to, but if you decide you want to

  • If you’d like to spend some alone time with your baby, and how much time you’ll think you’ll want or need

  • Whether or not you’d like to have photos or videos taken of your and your baby

  • Who will be keeping hospital-related mementos like the baby’s ID bracelet, baby blanket, stuffed animal, hat, etc.

  • Any other preferences you may have related to your hospital stay!

Keep in mind that it’s easier to have conversations with your child’s adoptive parents in-person rather than over the phone or via email. Their understanding of your preferences -- and your understanding of theirs -- will be much clearer that way, which reduces the chances of any confusion or miscommunication on the day of your child’s birth. Remember, the goal that day is for you to avoid any additional worry or stress, so you can be completely focused on the actual birth process.   

Your Preferences: Giving Birth 

Is there any moment more exciting in the adoption process than the moment your child is born? Both stressful and thrilling, the day of your child’s birth has a way of making the adoption process feel truly real. But childbirth varies between birth mothers, and not everyone’s labor and delivery process is a quick, easy one, so be mindful of that! Your preferences for giving birth should include:

  • If you’d like to give birth to your child naturally, have an epidural injection to reduce pain, or have an elective C-section. The decision is completely up to you and subject to change, depending upon your preferences.

  • Whether or not you’d like your baby’s adoptive parents or another member of your support system in the room with you for moral support at the time of your baby’s birth

  • If you’d like any photos or videos taken of you by a member of your support system

  • Any other preferences you have related to the labor and delivery process!

You needn’t worry too much, but it’s important to note that your preferences may also be subject to change depending upon certain health factors, risks or issues --  your own or your baby’s. In these cases, doctors will likely perform a c-section to ensure the health and safety of both you and your baby. Again, don’t overwhelm yourself by thinking excessively about the possibility of this -- C-sections are actually becoming increasingly common, which is why most doctors now offer them as a regular birthing method!

Start Creating Your Hospital or Birth Plan Today!

If you’re still not sure where to begin in terms of creating your adoption or birth plan, that’s ok! Rather than stressing about it, take all the time you need to really think about what you want in regard to both your hospital stay and your child’s birth. But remember that the day your child is born is one of the biggest milestones in the adoption process, which means that you’ll more than likely want to avoid any unnecessary stress if you can. By preparing your hospital and birth plan now, you’ll be doing just that!

And don’t forget -- if you need any assistance in creating your hospital or birth plan, Adoption Choices of Florida has got you covered. If you have any questions or concerns related to your hospital or birth plan, feel free to seek out guidance from one of our social workers or emotional support counselors. We’re always here to help! For more information on creating your hospital or birth plan, please visit our blog on Birth Mother Adoption Plan: In the Hospital.  

If you are a birth parent considering adoption, and have any questions or concerns about the process, please don’t hesitate to reach out. For more information on adoption, visit us at Adoption Choices of Florida or call us at: 800-985-8108